Vegetarian: As humans we have no claws or fangs; we’re not built to eat meat. Long digestive tract is built for processing fruits, vegetables and breaking down grains, nuts and seeds.

Note: Meat generates excessive uric acid in the body’s tissues; fish causes dehydration in the tissues, which is already a problem in the average American’s diet.12

Yogi Bhajan encouraged a strict lacto vegetarian diet, and suggested lots of green vegetables to cleanse and support our yogic lifestyle. He also mentioned the importance of consuming onion, ginger, and garlic.

“They used to call it a trinity root: onion, ginger, garlic were worshiped as trinity root. Onion for the blood, ginger for the nervous system, and garlic for the potency of the being and blood pressure.”                          Yogi Bhajan, 2/28/89

How can you incorporate a hefty dose of the Trinity Roots into your diet and begin to gain the incredible benefits that come by eating the three foods that Yogi Bhajan glorified?

The first step begins with your commitment to yourself and a healthier lifestyle that will enhance your Kundalini Yoga and meditation practice and morning sadhana. The second step is to bring substantial amounts of onions, garlic, and ginger into your kitchen. The third step begins with trying these simple recipes and building on the concepts and ideas presented here to seriously increase your intake, and reap the energetic and health giving rewards that the Trinity Roots can bring to your life.”

Raw vegetable juicing is another powerful way to detoxify and clean your temple, revivify your inner organs and rejuvenate your nervous system. It can increase vitality levels and keep you feeling energetic and youthful. Because of the easy assimilability of fresh raw vegetable juices and their supplemental nutritional value (using organic vegetables is best, when possible), I consider raw vegetable juicing one of the fountains of youth! (Some fruit juicing is okay; a minimum is suggested as too much will create a sugar imbalance in the body.)

Research and books on raw juicing can be found online and in larger health food stores.

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Siri Ved Kaur Khalsa spent many years cooking for and learning from Yogi Bhajan in Los Angeles. Check out her wonderful approaches to preparing sacred, tasty, fun food and recipes at her website and blog here!

 


3 responses to “Best foods to eat while developing your Kundalini Yoga practice”

  1. Ajit Singh says:

    Would like to know the recipes of trinity root.
    Thanks and Regards
    Ajit Singh

    • Jot Singh Khalsa says:

      Hello and Satnam Ajit Singh! One of the ‘trinity root rich’ foods which I call upon almost daily is something Yogi Bhajan encouraged us to eat regularly as Kundalini Yogis. (it can be very tasty and satisfying even if your not practicing Kundalini Yoga). Mung beans, rice and vegetables sometimes referred to as ‘Kitcheree’ is very easy for the body to digest and a wonderfully sustaining food. Below is one recipe and two ways of preparing kitcheree.

      Siri Ved Kaur Khalsa, a longtime student of Yogi Bhajan and someone who cooked for him personally for years, also has a website and blog here where you’ll find numerous recipes that will satisfy your thirst for foods rich in ‘trinity roots’. A cookbook to search for online by her is ‘From Vegetables, With Love’ Recipes & Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen by Siri Ved Kaur. The recipe below comes from a book I wrote on morning sadhana ‘The Essential Element’. There are numerous recipes in this book by longtime students of Yogi Bhajan who are excellent cooks, who personally cooked for him and their recipes are wonderfully ‘yogic’ (lots of trinity roots).

      Mung Beans, Rice, and Veggies
      Courtesy of Jot Singh Khalsa, Millis, MA, USA

      For 15-20 (Some can be frozen as soon as mostly cooled).

      Considered a staple and possibly the most recommended food for a yogic diet according to Yogi Bhajan and in my experience. He said that if your stools are sinking, you are sinking and recommended going on a 40-day mung bean, rice and vegetable diet to help tune up and rebalance the digestive system. We consistently enjoy it for one meal each day. Will taste fresh for 4-5 days. Vary the veggies from time to time, for fun and variety. Thaw frozen portions and reheat in toaster oven in Pyrex-like glass dish or on stovetop. Microwave is also ok, if necessary, but not highly recommended because of controversial heath effects.

      Ingredients
      2 cups of mung beans
      2 cups of white Basmatti rice (Lundberg Farms in California grows excellent organic white Basmatti or premium white Basmatti rices. These likely have substantially less or no pesticide residue compared to imported Basmatti rices.)
      I’m using ½ organic millet or brown rice these days instead of all white Basmati rice. (This began when I had Candida – a fungus which often arrives from too many sweets in one’s diet, and was recommended by my naturopathic doctor, instead of using all white rice).
      ⅔-¾ cups of olive oil, expeller pressed safflower or sunflower oils, or ghee (clarified butter) or any combination of them.
      2 tablespoon sea salt or to taste
      3 tablespoon each cumin seeds, black mustard seeds, turmeric (these are my spice preferences – you might like it a little spicy so add some black or red pepper, red chilis, or fresh hot peppers to taste)
      5-8″ ginger / 2 bulbs garlic, both peeled and chopped fine
      4 large (9 small) onions
      1 bunch fresh cilantro – de-stemmed and finely chopped

      Any of the following vegetables can have substitutes that might be your preference or just look fresher/more appealing/alive in your grocery store:
      3 zucchini, 1 small or ½ head cauliflower, 1 bunch broccoli
      3 carrots or beets or ½ lb. Brussels sprouts (choose one of the three)
      ½ lb. frozen corn

      Don’t chop any of the veggies too small (with the exception of the onions if you so choose) or they’ll disappear after cooking for a while and not too big of a deal if that happens.

      Preparation
      There are two ways that I prepare mung beans, rice and vegetables. I’ll refer to them as the ‘gourmet method’ and the ‘quick method’. The gourmet method may taste a bit more special, as taking the time to create a masala yields a wonderful medley of spices and the Trinity Root vegetables. For personal use, which is quite regular for me, I use the quick method. When I prepare them in larger quantities to feed a group, I use the gourmet method.

      Gourmet method:

      Soak mung beans overnight, rinse, then boil in 5-6 quarts. water in a fairly large pot (at least 3-5 gallon) until soft. Prepare masala (onion, ginger, garlic, spices and oil/ghee) in a second fairly large vessel, a wok, cast iron, stainless steel or other non-aluminum pot (cooking in aluminum is not good for humans – research online) by cooking medium/finely chopped onions in oil/ghee. Add seeds and cook on medium high heat. Stir constantly, then add finely chopped ginger. Continue cooking, then finally add finely chopped garlic. (Water can be added to prevent sticking.) Continue cooking for approximately 45-60 minutes and when onions are translucent add turmeric (and any other powdered spices you’ve chosen). Stir and cook another 15 minutes or so, stirring constantly still. When onions are very translucent and mixture appears to be a ‘merger’ of all ingredients, masala is done. (Should smell heavenly!) At the same time as you are preparing this masala mixture, begin adding chopped vegetables to the mung beans boiling in the other pot (harder veggies first: those that normally require longer cooking time.) Don’t chop any of the veggies too small or they’ll disappear after cooking for a while. After the mung beans/harder veggies come back to a boil, add the washed rice (if using millet add that first as it takes longer than rice to cook) and masala mixture and stir regularly. When that comes back to a boil and rice starts to swell (10-20 minutes), then add softer veggies and corn. After coming back to boil add cilantro. Continue stirring until rice seems to have become full sized and soft. Add salt. Stir thoroughly. Turn off heat and let sit until softer veggies become tender. Enjoy. Let cool before refrigerating/freezing.

      Quick method:
      No pressure cooker for mung beans – Soak mung beans overnight. Next day rinse and boil in 5-6 quarts. water until soft (maybe 30-40 minutes – so they squish between your fingers) in a fairly large pot (at least 3 gallon.) Use cast iron, stainless steel, or other non-aluminum cooking pot (cooking in aluminum is not good for humans – research is online.) Add medium chopped onions, ginger, garlic and seeds. Continue to slow boil. Add turmeric. After approximately 15 minutes begin adding vegetables; first the hardest veggies that will take the longest time to cook, then the softer veggies in order of estimated cooking time. Wait about 10 minutes after mixture comes back to a slow boil, after adding hardest veggies, to allow them to cook a bit. Add any other powdered spices you’ve chosen. Stir and cook another 15 minutes or so – stirring regularly. When all veggies are approaching tenderness, add rice, salt, and oil (if you use brown rice, add it 15 minutes prior.) If you use ghee or oils other than olive oil, they can be added at any point. If you use olive oil, it’s best consumed raw and can be added a bit at a time after you reheat your dish or at the conclusion of cooking this batch. Stir well and consistently. Continue cooking on med-low heat until rice swells to full size – add cilantro. Taste for salt. Salt can always be added – better to under salt than add too much. Let it cool largely before refrigerating or freezing.

      Using a pressure cooker for mung beans – Add rinsed, soaked mung beans, onions, ginger, and garlic to pressure cooker with a couple of tablespoons of your cooking oil/ghee. Add water so level should be up to about ¾ full or so. Bring to boil then turn down heat and pressure cook 40 minutes. At the same time in another pot (about a 3 gallon pot should work well) about ½ full of water brought to boil, begin by adding any seeds, and harder chopped vegetables/those that normally require longer cooking time. After harder veggies come back to a boil add turmeric (if you use brown rice, add that also), and continue to add veggies, leaving softest veggies for last (if you use white rice, add it with the softest veggies), stir regularly. When that comes back to a boil on a medium low heat and rice starts to swell (10-15 minutes) then add softest veggies and corn – continue stirring until rice seems to have become full sized and soft. Add salt, rest of oil and cilantro – stir thoroughly turn down or off heat and let sit until softer veggies become tender. If you use ghee or oils other than olive oil, they can be added at any point. If you use olive oil, it’s best consumed raw and can be added a bit at a time after you reheat your dish or at the conclusion of cooking this batch. Stir well and consistently. Continue cooking on med-low heat until rice swells to full size – add cilantro. Taste for salt. Salt can always be added – better to under salt than add too much. Let it cool largely before refrigerating or freezing.

  2. Tiffany says:

    This sounds delicious! I’m going to try this very soon. Can’t wait to see how it tastes after freezing. Always nice to have a quick heat up meal on a busy day that’s nutritious and delicious. Sat nam. Thank you for sharing this.

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